Sedyl - Structure et Dynamique des Langues - UMR8202 - CELIA


Archives de la recherche


17-11-2017

Séminaire doctoral - Théories et données linguistiques
Animé par A. Donabédian et A. Mardale
INALCO - S. 4.23-4.24 -14h30-17h30

Cette séance aura lieu dans le cadre du colloque Diachronie du Marquage Differentiel de l'Objet.


17-11-2017

Séminaire doctoral - Pratiques langagières - terrains, méthodes, théories
Animé par I. Léglise et V. Muni Toke
Villejuif - Bât.D - S.511 - 14h00-18h00

Thomas Ricento (University of Calgary)
Immigrants, Language, and Integration into the Canada Labor Market


Changes to the 2002 Immigration and Refugee Protection Act focused on identifying immigrants based on their ability to integrate into the Canadian labor market (CIC 2010). The Federal Skilled Workers Program (FSWP) recognizes factors such as education, experience, and language ability through the awarding of points based on a grid. Yet, many studies have shown that immigrants’ labor market outcomes have declined over the last several decades, even though their average level of education is higher than that of the Canadian-born population (e.g., Hawthorne 2008). The importance of English and French literacy skills has been identified as having significant direct and indirect influences on labor market outcomes (Ferrer, et al. 2006). Yet, research has also shown that difficulty in getting foreign credentials recognized as meeting Canadian standards is a barrier to labor market integration (Schellenberg and Maheux 2007), irrespective of acceptable scores on the Canadian Language Benchmark tool in an official language. In this presentation, I report the findings from a two-year ethnographic study carried out in Calgary, Canada. In Phase II of this project, 6 families were chosen for an in-depth ethnographic study over a 10-month period which included more than 100 hours of recorded interviews. The findings demonstrate both the tenacity of individuals seeking a new life in Canada, and their frustrations as ‘foreigners’ whose cultural capital is not recognized by credentialing authorities and employers. The study also revealed that there is a significant non-alignment between the curriculum of the LINC (Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada) program, assessment of relevant language competencies, and the actual needs of skilled workers seeking to reestablish their professional careers in Canada.
References
CIC (Citizenship and Immigration Canada). (2010). Evaluation of the Federal Skilled Worker Program. Available at: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/resources/evaluation/fswp/.
Ferrer, A., Green, D.A., and Riddell, W.C.. (2006). “The Effect of Literacy on Immigrant Earnings.” Journal of Human Resources 41 (2): 380-410.
Hawthorne, L. (2008). “The Impact of Economic Selection Policy on Labour Market Outcomes for Degree-Qualified Migrants in Canada and Australia.” IRPP Choices 14 (5): 1-50.
Schellenberg, G., and Maheux, H. (2007). “Immigrants’ Perspectives on Their First Four Years in Canada: Highlights from Three Waves of the Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Canada.” Canadian Social Trends. Catalogue no: 11-008-X. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

20-11-2017

PLURIEL - Axe 2
Resp.  I. Léglise, V. Muni Toke et S. Alby
INALCO - Salons -rue de Lille - 10h00-12h00

Thomas Ricento (University of Calgary)
Language Policy and Planning:  The Nature and Goals of a Scholarly Tradition With Multiple Roots and Multiple Functions


 While it is tempting to characterize LPP as sub-discipline of sociolinguistics, or in keeping with the current and ubiquitous term, an inter-discipline (Graff, 2015), such designations tend to break down for various reasons.  The most fundamental problem in placing or locating LPP within particular academic niches is the lack of shared agreement on the goals of research or the nature of the field; in plain terms, the ‘it’ that we are ‘studying’, the ‘why’ we are studying ‘it’, and the ‘how’ our findings will make a difference in the world are disparate and ill-defined (if defined at all in our published research).   The public, generally, can understand the reasons for conducting research to find cures for deadly diseases, for developing cheaper and cleaner sources of energy, even for alleviating poverty in the poorest nations (even though they might oppose paying for such research or question the likelihood that such research will lead to positive social outcomes).  Yet, if we were to ask that same public to identify ‘language problems’ that might be ameliorated or solved by publicly-funded research, they would likely not immediately understand the question and would require lengthy explanations that would inevitably lead to a discussion on values, norms, and personal beliefs and prejudices (‘Don’t tell me I need to learn more languages!  The one I speak is just fine, thank you!’ Or, ‘Language is a private matter, except when it comes to education, etc.’, or ‘My English is not that good, especially the grammar’, etc.).  In the end, what ‘we’ do as researchers/scholars is analyze, describe, assess, and conceptualize conditions of living where language is an important factor by selecting appropriate and relevant ideas, approaches, theories, concepts, and methods from different fields or disciplines.  As Graff (2015: 5) notes, ‘Those choices, whether successful or not, influence central questions and problems…Like disciplines, interdisciplines are diverse in paths, locations, relationships to disciplines, organization and institutionalization.”  I am not arguing for a ‘narrowing’ or reduction of methodological or theoretical approaches or ‘paths’ to enhance the (inter)disciplinary and institutional ‘clout’ of LPP in order to gain more funding or greater academic visibility and prestige; that seems to me to be contrary to the rich scholarly tradition of LPP (see Ricento, 2016: 1-21 for an extended discussion).  The challenge, as I see it, if our work is to have any broad impact on public consciousness, is to clearly identify our values and goals as change agents and be clearer on why we conduct research and why we think our work, our ideas, our findings, and the policies we advocate serve the common good, as best we understand it.  In this talk, I will describe the challenges and benefits of maintaining the highest ethical standards in research while advocating for language policies that are consistent with our most profound moral commitments to equality, fairness, and societal inclusion.
References
Graff, H. (2015). Undisciplining knowledge. Baltimore:  Johns Hopkins Press.
Ricento, T. (2016).  General introduction.  In T. Ricento (ed.), Language policy and planning: Critical concepts in linguistics, Volume I, (pp. 1-21).  New York:  Routledge.


29-11-2017

Temps et temporalité en Asie du Sud-Est
Paris, Inalco, 65 rue des Grands Moulins
29 novembre-2 décembre 2017

                                                                                       Programme             Résumés


08-12-2017

Séminaire doctoral - Pratiques langagières - terrains, méthodes, théories
Animé par I. Léglise et V. Muni Toke
Villejuif - Bât.D - S.511 - 14h00-18h00

Séance consacrée au travail demandé pour l'évaluation des étudiant.e.s de M2


12-12-2017

Atelier Doculang Linguistique de terrain et documentation
Responsables K. Haude & D. Costaouec
Villejuif - Bât.D - S.511 - 11h15-13h00

Katharina Haude : expériences de terrain chez les movima


15-12-2017

Séminaire doctoral - Théories et données linguistiques
Animé par A. Donabédian et A. Mardale
INALCO - S.3.11 - 14h30-17h30

Okan Kubus
Relativization Strategies in Turkish Sign Language
(la communication sera donnée en langue des signes avec un interprète)

This paper aims to illustrate relative clause constructions in Turkish Sign Language (TİD). The signers of TİD prefer circumnominal and postnominal strategies, and Nonmanuals (i.e. squint, brow raise or slight-headshake) and occasionally additional relativizers (i.e. clause initial Index sign, clause final Index sign, AYNI ‘same’ or different combinations of them) mark relative clauses in TİD. An empirical investigation of relativization strategies in TİD at discourse level suggests that the usage of nonmanual markers and relativizers does not seem to be fully systematic. I suggest that the nature of relativization in TİD can be better understood at discourse level and that there might be a grammaticalization process in the direction of increasing syntactic marking of relative clauses.

19-01-2018

Séminaire doctoral - Théories et données linguistiques
Animé par A. Donabédian et A. Mardale
INALCO - S.4.05 - 14h30-17h30